Husky Happenings

Freeland announces farewell events for this week As his tenure as head of the university draws to a close, President Richard Freeland announced he will make a series of on-campus visits to express appreciation to faculty, staff and students for the “many contributions to the vibrancy of campus life and the upward momentum of our great university,” according to a letter released yesterday. Students, staff and faculty are invited to join President Freeland at the following dates: March 16, from noon to 1 p.m. in the Stetson East Dining Hall; March 17, from 12:30 p.m. to 2 p.m. in the West Addition of the Curry Student Center; March 29, from 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. in the Marino Center; April 18, from noon to 1 p.m. in the Stetson West Dining Hall; April 20, from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the Senior Brunch; May 1, from 6 p.m. to 11 p.m. at the Senior Ball; and May 3, from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. during Cap and Gown Pickup.

– Ricky Thompson, News Staff

Faculty approves new degree programs for SPCS The Faculty Senate approved three new degree programs at its March 1 meeting. Two were approved unanimously, and one was only passed after extensive debate. The more contentious program was an Executive Doctorate in Law and Policy, which was proposed for the School of Professional and Continuing Students (SPCS). The doctorate, a unique degree option in the Northeast, would target applicants with extensive experience in their fields. While some senators expressed dissatisfaction with the proposal and the criteria for applicants, saying it lacked clarity, it eventually passed 18 – 2, with three abstentions. Stuart Peterfreund, an English professor, spoke in favor of the proposed degree. “It’s time to lead and not worry about who we’re following,” Peterfreund said. “We’re at a point as an institution where it’s time not to look like other people.” The degrees approved included a master’s degree in Global Studies and International Affairs and a master’s degree in Geographic Information Technology, both within the SPCS.

– Hailey Heinz, News Staff

Bone marrow drive seeks minority donors Academic and Cultural Enrichment Services (ACES) and University Health and Counseling Services (UHCS) will hold a bone marrow donor drive on campus next Wednesday. All eligible, healthy blood donors between the ages of 18 and 60 are encouraged to complete a health history form and donate one tablespoon of blood in a process that typically takes 10 to 15 minutes, according to a release. The drive is geared toward minorities because marrow matches are more likely within a patient’s own ethnic group, and of the 3.5 million registered donors, all ethnic minorities combined make up less than 30 percent of donors, posing a problem for minority people with blood diseases. Blood is collected from a finger prick, and if selected as a candidate, students will undergo further tests and examinations before being selected to donate. Participants will be entered into a raffle to win prizes, including an iPod, according to the release. The confidential and anonymous procedure will be held from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. in 344 Curry Student Center.

– Ricky Thompson, News Staff

Northeastern, Menino host gun violence summit Last Friday, Northeastern hosted “Know More; Do More,” a series of speakers and panel discussions as part of Boston’s Community Summit on Youth and Handgun Violence. The day-long seminar focused on the nature of handgun violence in Boston and other cities in the country and featured a number of high-profile speakers, including Boston Mayor Thomas M. Menino, Boston Police Department Commissioner Kathleen O’Toole and Northeastern President Richard Freeland. The discussions were followed by a number of workshops designed to explore four aspects of youth handgun violence: the role of media, the influence of gangs, the need for support and the best practices in community re-entry for youth offenders. In 2005, there were 75 homicides in Boston – the city’s highest number in 10 years – and last January, gun murders in Boston doubled from the previous year, while nonfatal shootings leaped 189 percent.

– Ricky Thompson, News Staff

BRC funds events for LASO, Haitian Student Unity At its March 1 meeting, the Budget Review Committee (BRC) allocated $11,871 to the Haitian Student Unity (HSU) to bring the Haitian band T-Vice to campus, according to Christopher Kelley, assistant vice president for financial affairs. The group brought another Haitian band to campus last year and had a turnout of 400 students, HSU representatives said. At the same meeting, BRC also allocated $325 for the Latin American Student Organization for “Reggaeton: Connecting Across Cultures.” The event will showcase reggaeton, a Caribbean music genre, and will include music samples and speaker Ejima Baker, who teaches courses on reggaeton and is a Ph.D. candidate at City University of New York Graduate Center.

– Hailey Heinz, News Staff

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